Saint George

Saint George

  • Short, concise biography of Saint George
  • History, Life, Biography, Facts and Information about Saint George
  • Fast, concise facts and information about Saint George
  • What is Saint George the patron of?
  • Date of Death
  • How Saint George is represented in Christian Art
  • Feast Day

Saint George

The Patron Saint George
What is the definition and the meaning of the Patron Saints and why were these people chosen to become patrons of causes, professions and countries? The term 'Patron' is used in Christian religions, including the Roman Catholic religion, to describe holy and virtuous men and women who are considered to be a defender of a specific group of people or of a country. There is a patron for virtually every cause, country, profession or special interest. There are two categories of saints: martyrs and confessors.

 
 

Fast, concise facts and information about Saint George
The following provides fast and concise facts and information:

  • The patron of England, Chivalry and Soldiers
  • Born: c 275
  • Memorial Day / Feast Day: April 23rd
  • Date of Death: Saint George died April 23, 303
  • Cause of Death: Tortured and Beheaded

Who or what is Saint George the patron saint of?
Saint George is the patron of England, Chivalry and Soldiers. Meanings, definition and origins - a patron is considered to be a defender of a specific group of people or of a nation. There is a patron for virtually every cause, profession or special interest. Prayers are considered more likely to be answered by asking a patron for intercession on their behalf.

Prayer to Saint George

The Story and History of Saint George
The story and history of Saint George. Saint George was born with the name of Grigoris c275AD in the Roman provincial city of Nicomedia, Bithynia under the rule of the Roman Emperor Diocletian (r.284-305). Emperor Diocletian mounted some of the fiercest persecutions of the early Christian Church. Grigoris became a Roman soldier and rose to the rank of tribune in the Roman army. He converted to Christianity, an extremely dangerous belief during the reign of Diocletian. His beliefs were discovered when as a tribune in the Roamn Army he was expected to take part in rituals and sacrifices to the pagan Roman Gods. He refused and confessed his faith and sentenced to torture followed by death by beheading.

Death of Saint George
There are two categories of saints: martyrs and confessors. A Christian martyr is regarded as one who is put to death for his Christian faith or convictions. Confessors are people who died natural deaths. Date of Death: Saint George died in A.D. 303. Cause of Death: Tortured and Beheaded.   

Facts about the story of of Saint George and the Dragon
The legend of Saint George have varied over time. The common factors of the legend are a dragon or serpent, armies were unable to slay the dragon, when food ran out the dragon was fed with maidens, a brave knight slayed the dragon before a princess was sacrificed to the dragon. It should also be noted that Saint George became popular during the Middle ages (the age of Knights and chivalry) when the dragon was commonly used to represent the Devil. The slaying of the dragon by Saint George was first attributed to Saint George in the twelfth century which was long after his death and during the period of the Crusades and after the Norman Conquest of England. Up to this point Saint Dunstan was revered as the Patron Saint of England.

The Legend of Saint George and the Dragon
The most popular legend of Saint George and the Dragon is therefore as follows: A fierce dragon (possibly a serpent)  lived in a lake near Silena, Libya and terrorised the local pagan inhabitants. The dragon ate all of the sheep in the district and at this point started to devour the local maidens. Armies tried to defeat the dragon but failed. Saint George came to the rescue when he was told of the story by a hermit. Saint George arrived in Silena in time to save the Princess and was able to slay the dragon with a single blow with his lance. Before Saint George killed the dragon he made the sign of the cross and prayed for help. After Saint George slayed the dragon he converted all of the heathen inhabitants of the area to Christianity.

Saint George, the Patron Saint of England
Saint George was revered as the Patron Saint of England and the patron of Christian chivalry, owing to the signal assistance which he rendered to Godfrey of Boulogne in the first crusade. George is the patron saint of England, because Richard Coeur-de-Lion, while in Palestine, placed himself and his army under his special protection. For the like reason he is the patron of soldiers and armourers.

Saint George, the First Crusade and Godfrey, Count of Bouillon
One of the most famous of all the leaders of the First Crusade was Godfrey, Count of Bouillon, or Boulogne, (c.1060-1100) a medieval Norman knight from Northern France. The objective of the First Crusade was to capture Jerusalem. On route to Jerusalem the crusaders took possession of the little town of Ramleh which was said to be the burial place of Saint George. During the battle for Jerusalem retreat seemed inevitable for the Crusaders until a vision appeared. On the Mount of Olives appeared a vision of a knight in glittering armour, waving a flaming sword over Jerusalem. The rumour quickly spread that it was Saint George who had come to the aid of the Crusaders led by Godfrey of Bouillon.

Saint George, the First Crusade and Godfrey, Count of Bouillon
King Richard I (September 8, 1157 April 6, 1199) was the King of England known as Richard the Lionheart, or Cur de Lion. Richard the Lionheart was a brave leader of the Third Crusade where he fought against Saladin. The vision of Saint George during the First Crusade was well remembered by the crusaders and King Richard the Lionheart placed himself and his army under the special protection of Saint George. King Richard and his crusaders adopted the emblem of Saint George, a red cross on a white background, and the crusaders wore it on their tunics over their armour.

How Saint George is represented in Christian Art
It is helpful to be able to recognise Saint George in paintings, stained glass windows, illuminated manuscripts, architecture and other forms of Christian art. The artistic representations reflect the life or death of saints, or an aspect of life with which the person is most closely associated. Saint George is represented in Christian Art as young, or in the prime of life, and beardless. He wears either the dress of a Roman soldier or a complete suit of armour. His shield bears the Latin cross, which, until the union of the three kingdoms, formed the national standard of England. When mounted he holds in one hand a white banner with a red cross upon it. His lance is generally broken, from the account in the legend that "his lance being broken, he slew the dragon with his sword." The slain monster lies at his feet.

Feast Day of Saint George
The Feast Day of Saint George is April 23rd. The origin of Feast Days: most saints have specially designated feast days and are associated with a specific day of the year and these are referred to as the saint's feast day. The feast days first arose from the very early Christian custom of the annual commemoration of martyrs on the dates of their deaths at the same time celebrating their birth into heaven.

 

Saint George

  • Short, concise biography
  • History, Life, Biography, Facts and Information about Saint George
  • Fast, concise facts and information about Saint George
  • What is Saint George the patron of?
  • Date of Death: 303
  • How Saint George is represented in Christian Art
  • Memorial, or Feast Day, of Saint George
  • History, Life, Biography, Facts and Information
 
 

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Saint George